An analysis of emily dickinsons the brain is wider than the sky

Both Eastern and Wester religious philosophical expound principles that the Divine Creator created His children in His image. Emily remained at the seminary for only one year.

The Brain—is Wider Than The Sky - Poem by Emily Dickinson

The Brain—is wider than the Sky— For—put them side by side— The one the other will contain With ease—and You—beside— The Brain is deeper than the sea— For—hold them—Blue to Blue— The one the other will absorb— As Sponges—Buckets—do— The Brain is just the weight of God— For—Heft them—Pound for Pound— And they will differ—if they do— As Syllable from Sound— by Emily Dickinson This is an interesting poem because it compares a physically small object the brain to vast, huge spaces such as the sky and ocean as well as a theoretically large figure God.

Ways of Reading 9th Edition. Dickinson states that the brain will differ from the weight of God only in the way that syllable differs from sound. By this time in her life, Emily was discovering the joy of soul-discovery through her art.

Brain Power The Brain—is wider than the Sky— For—put them side by side— The one the other will contain With ease—and You—beside— The first stanza contrasts the brain with the sky claiming that the brain is wider because it can think about the sky and at the same time can think about the person who is thinking about the sky, and it can perform this operation easily.

Anyone would argue that a sponge is smaller than a bucket, but the bucket does not have the same ability as the sponge.

Interesting Literature

This stanza inflicts an interpretive difficulty; certain readers might mistakenly believe that the speaker is making a blasphemous assertion that the brain and God the same.

Possibly, Emily was convinced that her life would not be the traditional one of wife, mother, and householder; she has even stated as much: This puts the comparison in a much less complex perspective in relation to the rest of the poem. After all, it is the brain that conceives the notion of God.

Though they often baffle upon first encounter, they reward readers mightily who stay with each poem and dig out the nuggets of golden wisdom. Therefore a syllable is more characteristic of a human while sound is more abstract, universal, and possibly even divine.

A syllable is very much like a unit of speech, or a single sound used to form a word. Emily was the second child of three: Whereas sound, on the other hand, is more of an uncontrolled source of noise.

More Brain Power The Brain is deeper than the sea— For—hold them—Blue to Blue— The one the other will absorb— As Sponges—Buckets—do— The second stanza contrasts the brain with the sea asserting that the brain can take in the sea as a sponge sucks up a bucket of water, once again referencing the vast thinking ability of the brain.

The school took pride in offering college level course in the sciences from astronomy to zoology. In order to understand this, one must look into the difference between the two comparisons.

However, figuratively speaking the brain is wider than the sky because it has the ability to learn and access all the information under the sun. Readers can thank Thomas H. Much speculation abounds regarding some of the most known facts about her.

A total of individual poems have made their way to publication. Undoubtedly, as she composed this poem, she kept in mind the following biblical claim from Genesis 1: However, after much speculation, the meaning is clear. Emily enjoyed school, and her poems testify to the skill with which she mastered her academic lessons.

She seemed quite content to leave in order to stay home. As the speaker makes her claim that the brain and God are close in essence, she places forth the fact that they do differ—they differ one from the other as a "syllable" differs from a "sound.

Still, God remains greater than the brain because while the brain is a syllable, God is sound, or the brain is a representation of God, as a syllable is a representation of sound.

Emily died on May 15, As a stay-at-home daughter in 19th century New England, Emily was expected to take on her share of domestic duties, including housework, likely to help prepare said daughters for handling their own homes after marriage. Although our brains do not expand very much physically speaking throughout our lifetimes, they are constantly growing in the sense that we learn more and more each day.

House of Representative as a representative of Massachusetts. Walker Percy would approve of such an excursion, which is very similar to his story of the dogfish and other authentic experiences.

Obviously the sky contains the brain, because the sky is the larger space in which the brain exists. Education Emily attended the primary grades in a one room school until being sent to Amherst Academy, which became Amherst College.

The last stanza proved to be the most difficult to analyze. A brain inside the ocean would allow the human to explore the environment and learn about the surroundings. The regularization of her technical achievements with grammar and punctuation obliterated the high achievement that the poet had so creatively accomplished.

Likely her reclusiveness was beginning, and she felt the need to control her own learning and schedule her own life activities. Austin, her older brother who was born April 16,and Lavinia, her younger sister, born February 28, The sky and the sea are huge creations, and yet the brain can conceive of them as ideas, which means that the brain can hold them—or at least hold the ideas of them.Technical analysis of The Brain—is wider than the Sky— literary devices and the technique of Emily Dickinson.

Emily Dickinson's

Feb 01,  · Still, God remains greater than the brain because while the brain is a syllable, God is sound, or the brain is a representation of God, as a syllable is a representation of sound. Dickinson's Titles Emily Dickinson did not provide titles to her 1, poems; therefore, each poem's first line becomes the ultimedescente.coms: 2.

A summary of “The Brain—is wider than the Sky—” in Emily Dickinson's Dickinson’s Poetry. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Dickinson’s Poetry and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. "The Brain—is wider than the Sky—" is probably one of Dickinson's more popular poems, maybe because it's not quite as cryptic as some of them (though cryptic is fun, too). In it, you'll find some of Emily's favorite themes, like nature, spirituality, and an extreme respect for the power of the human mind.

Dec 31,  · Dickinson claims that the brain is wider than the sky, yet follows up with “For-put them side by side- The one the other will contain ”. Obviously the sky contains the brain, because the sky is the larger space in which the brain exists. The Brain—is Wider Than The Sky by Emily Dickinson The Brainis wider than the Sky Forput them side by side The one the other will contain With easeand Youbeside The Brain is deeper than the sea/5(3).

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An analysis of emily dickinsons the brain is wider than the sky
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